Solution architects typically produce Solution outlines and migration paths that show the evolution of a system from baseline state to target state. A Solution Architect is often but not always responsible for design to ensure that the target applications, in a technical architecture, will meet non-functional requirements.

Solution Architecture often leads to detailed software architecture work and technical architecture work, and often contains elements of those.

Aria Consulting’s Solution Architecture work typically starts at high-level conceptual and works down to a mid-level of detail prior to hand-off to software engineering/application architecture.

A Solution Architecture may be described in a document at the level of a solution vision or a more detailed solution outline. It typically specifies a system (itself usually a subsystem in a wider enterprise system) that is intended to solve a specific problem and/or meet a given set of requirements.

It may be an IT system to support a single business role or process. For example, an end-to-end eCommerce system that allows customers to place orders for goods and services; or an end-to-end Supply Chain system that enables an enterprise to order new stock from its suppliers.

A solution outline typically defines the business context, business data to be created or used, the application components needed, the technology platform components needed, along with whatever is needed to meet non-functional requirements (speed, throughput, availability, reliability recoverability, integrity, security, scalability, service ability, etc.).

In other contexts, a wide range of stakeholders, even business owners, may be concerned to review a solution vision or solution outline and monitor progress towards implementation.

Generally speaking, an Enterprise Architect’s deliverables are more abstract than a Solution Architect’s deliverables. But that is not always the case. The main distinction between Enterprise Architect and Solution Architect lies in their different motivations.

The Solutions Architect is primarily employed to help and support program and project managers in the design, planning and direction of specific implementation projects. The Enterprise Architect has more strategic and cross-organizational concerns, and strives to optimize solution delivery across the organization.

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The role of “Solutions Architect requires knowledge and skills that are both broad and deep. To be effective the Solutions Architect must have experience on multiple hardware and software environments and be comfortable with complex heterogeneous systems environments. Lorne is a highly seasoned senior technocrat who has led many projects through the software development process or Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Lorne has experience in over 25 projects across a multitude of client organizations spanning from smaller organizations to multi-national enterprises and covering a variety of industry verticals including all 3 levels of Canadian government as well as working with clients in various parts of the United States.

Lorne is responsible for the development of the overall vision that underlies the projected solution and transforms that vision through execution into the end-to-end solution. The best time for Lorne to become involved with a project is at the time of inception and then be involved in the Functional analysis (FA) of defining and articulating the requirements. They then remain involved throughout the balance of the project with the responsibility to ensure that what is ultimately delivered is what will best meet the needs of the organization, be it a single department or business function or the whole organization.

Solution architects typically produce Solution outlines and migration paths that show the evolution of a system from baseline state to target state. A Solution Architect is often but not always responsible for design to ensure that the target applications, in a technical architecture, will meet non-functional requirements.

Solution Architecture often leads to detailed software architecture work and technical architecture work, and often contains elements of those.

System_Architecture21Aria Consulting’s Solution Architecture work typically starts at high-level conceptual and works down to a mid-level of detail prior to hand-off to software engineering/application architecture.

A Solution Architecture may be described in a document at the level of a solution vision or a more detailed solution outline. It typically specifies a system (itself usually a subsystem in a wider enterprise system) that is intended to solve a specific problem and/or meet a given set of requirements.

It may be an IT system to support a single business role or process. For example, an end-to-end eCommerce system that allows customers to place orders for goods and services; or an end-to-end Supply Chain system that enables an enterprise to order new stock from its suppliers.

A solution outline typically defines the business context, business data to be created or used, the application components needed, the technology platform components needed, along with whatever is needed to meet non-functional requirements (speed, throughput, availability, reliability recoverability, integrity, security, scalability, service ability, etc.).

In other contexts, a wide range of stakeholders, even business owners, may be concerned to review a solution vision or solution outline and monitor progress towards implementation.

Generally speaking, an Enterprise Architect’s deliverables are more abstract than a Solution Architect’s deliverables. But that is not always the case. The main distinction between Enterprise Architect and Solution Architect lies in their different motivations.

The Solutions Architect is primarily employed to help and support program and project managers in the design, planning and direction of specific implementation projects. The Enterprise Architect has more strategic and cross-organizational concerns, and strives to optimize solution delivery across the organization.

The role of “Solutions Architect requires knowledge and skills that are both broad and deep. To be effective the Solutions Architect must have experience on multiple hardware and software environments and be comfortable with complex heterogeneous systems environments. Lorne is a highly seasoned senior technocrat who has led many projects through the software development process or Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Lorne has experience in over 25 projects across fig1-step41a multitude of client organizations spanning from smaller organizations to multi-national enterprises and covering a variety of industry verticals including all 3 levels of Canadian government as well as working with clients in various parts of the United States.

Lorne is responsible for the development of the overall vision that underlies the projected solution and transforms that vision through execution into the end-to-end solution. The best time for Lorne to become involved with a project is at the time of inception and then be involved in the Functional analysis (FA) of defining and articulating the requirements. They then remain involved throughout the balance of the project with the responsibility to ensure that what is ultimately delivered is what will best meet the needs of the organization, be it a single department or business function or the whole organization.